Storming the Court: How a Band of Law Students Fought the President--and Won

Storming the Court How a Band of Law Students Fought the President and Won In three hundred innocent Haitian men women and children who had qualified for political asylum in the United States were detained at Guant namo Bay Cuba and told they might never be freed Ch

  • Title: Storming the Court: How a Band of Law Students Fought the President--and Won
  • Author: Brandt Goldstein
  • ISBN: 9781416535157
  • Page: 143
  • Format: Paperback
  • In 1992, three hundred innocent Haitian men, women, and children who had qualified for political asylum in the United States were detained at Guant namo Bay, Cuba and told they might never be freed Charismatic democracy activist Yvonne Pascal and her fellow refugees had no contact with the outside world, no lawyers, and no hope until a group of inspired Yale LawIn 1992, three hundred innocent Haitian men, women, and children who had qualified for political asylum in the United States were detained at Guant namo Bay, Cuba and told they might never be freed Charismatic democracy activist Yvonne Pascal and her fellow refugees had no contact with the outside world, no lawyers, and no hope until a group of inspired Yale Law School students vowed to free them Pitting the students and their untested professor Harold Koh against Kenneth Starr, the Justice Department, the Pentagon, and Presidents George H W Bush and Bill Clinton, this real life legal thriller takes the reader from the halls of Yale and the federal courts of New York to the slums of Port au Prince and the windswept hills of Guant namo Bay and ultimately to the U.S Supreme Court Written with grace and passion, Storming the Court captures the emotional highs and despairing lows of a legal education like no other a high stakes courtroom campaign against the White House in the name of the greatest of American values freedom.

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      Published :2020-05-27T11:52:16+00:00


    About “Brandt Goldstein

    • Brandt Goldstein

      Brandt Goldstein Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Storming the Court: How a Band of Law Students Fought the President--and Won book, this is one of the most wanted Brandt Goldstein author readers around the world.



    165 thoughts on “Storming the Court: How a Band of Law Students Fought the President--and Won

    • Interesting subject matter: the Haitian refugees case and the perennial problem of the USA Guantanamo Bay prison in Cuba.Sometimes the story just stops moving forward. An unwieldy cast: at least there's a Who's Who in the back of the book. One-sided: unconditional acceptance of boat people by the reader is an assumption. He's cheerleading for the student lawyers. More balanced and disciplined debate and scholarship would have been an improvement. This book has a Movie of the Week quality that ju [...]



    • This book is packed with information but still reads like a story thanks to more emotional and personal details of key players. There is also a very helpful list of terms in the back for people less familiar with legal terms and jargon. Storming the Court followed just one case of Haitian immigrants being detained on Guantanamo, but it it stimulated broader thought on immigration policy and the US court system, as it addresses strategy behind bringing the cases to court. Although focused in deta [...]


    • Excellent reportage novel. It is dealing with the real court case on 'Haiti Refugee' in the United States of America. Analysis of the social structural and illustration of case is detailed and meticulous. However, the perspective of the author is based on humanity.



    • I blew through this book in three days - I simply just couldn't put it down. The writing was pretty good (page-turner style) and easy to read. What really drew me in, of course, was the story. Tremendously inspiring."Storming the Court" depicts how [now former YLS Dean:] Harold Koh & a bunch of students (including my own clinic professor, Mike Wishnie) from the Lowenstein Clinic at YLS (plus their allies) took on the Herculean job of freeing the Haitians from Guantanamo Bay in the early '90s [...]


    • This book described the legal situation regarding Haitian refugees who were being held at Guantanamo Bay. I was struck by the comparisons that could be drawn, as well as the contrasts, with the more recent prisoners held at Guantanamo Bay. Now, in hearing about the children crossing the border here, I am reminded again of this book and the discussion of the laws concerning refugees seeking asylum.I wish that the description of the "two sides" was more balanced; there was a definite prejudice in [...]


    • 5 star story, 3 star writing. I can't shake how distressed I am that I didn't know more about this story before reading the book and how badly these Haitians were treated by both the first Bush and Clinton administrations. That law students were able to play such a role in this litigation is not only inspirational, but also highlights that it could only have happened at a place like Yale without rigid law school grades. I only wish other law schools would consider this. I got the impression that [...]


    • I could not put this book down. It is the gripping tale of the true story of Yale law students and their professor who took the US government to court over the treatment of Haitian refugees that were the first people to have the pleasure of accommodations on Guantanamo Bay's military base. The story includes the viewpoint of the students, the professor, and one of the refugees in the camp. The legal issues have continuing relevance for obvious reasons. One issue that concerned the Haitians is th [...]


    • Storming the Court is a compelling story, but the writing is just not all that great. It's clear that the story is fairly one-sided, as there is little to no critical examination of the actions made by the Yale team. It's a feel-good story, of course, and a relatively compelling read. The legal issues are portrayed in a way that's relatively easy to understand, which, given that the case is quite complex, is an accomplishment in and of itself.If the book had been better written and the protagoni [...]


    • Disclaimer: I have a particular interest in legal issues and was actually required to read this by my very worldly immigration professor. That being said, anyone with a particular interest in politics, world affairs, civil rights and specifically Guantanamo Bay should read this. It's thought provoking, intelligent and inspiring. My one critique is that the author uses to much legalese (legal speak) and since the topic is of interest to a variety of people, it's my humble opinion that the legales [...]


    • I imagine law practice can be disappointing at times, but other times you can really see that you have made a positive difference for people. Yale might be unlike most law schools, but this is a real underdog story of how some law students took on an unfavorable Washington policy in court and won. Questionable Guantanamo detention practices still exist today, of course. So it was interesting to read a story from the 90's in today's context.


    • As a possible prospective law student, this book was very inspirational. It was very interesting to read about immigration law and the different tactics that each side will use to win their case. Also, not only was there law, but also a story of a woman wanting the best for her family and struggling to survive. Then, when she is on American soil, it is in Guantanamo Bay!!! This is a great book for law and if not for law just a great story overall. Highly suggested.


    • This story reaffirms my faith in the law and the power it can provide even the beginner apprentice. I appreciated the author's frank account of the good and the bad in this true saga, and the richness of detail he provided in his description of an astounding cast of characters.


    • About the attempt to end the detention of Haitian refugees in Guantanamo in the 1990s. The first attempt by the US to argue that people held at Gitmo had no rights so relevant and good. In case you were wondering, that "give me your huddled masses yearning to breathe free" thing? Bullshit.


    • This book read like a fast-paced thriller to me, and I was surprised at how fascinating law and all the legal jargon became for me. The true story account was incredibly well-written and researched. An inspiration!


    • Surely a page turning thriller, the book highlights the daunting tasks legal professionals are face with when dealing with the American Legal system. Further, Goldstein demonstrates how American politics interfere with judicial justice in human and civil rights cases.


    • Brandt is my neighbor and went to Brown with one of my professors/mentors. He's pretty great, and so's his book. They're making into a movie. My friend who graduated from Yale Law last year says that the portrayal of Harold Koh is right on.






    • Very quick read and inspiring to hear what can be done as a law student. This book also made me really excited about doing international human rights work.


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